Choko

Chayote (Sechium edule), also known as mirliton and choko, is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family, Cucurbitaceae. This fruit was first cultivated in the Mesoamericas between southern Mexico and Honduras, with the most genetic diversity available in both Mexico and Guatemala. It is one of several foods introduced to the Old World during the Columbian Exchange. At that time, the plant spread to other parts of the Americas, ultimately causing it to be integrated into the cuisine of many Latin American nations. The chayote fruit is mostly used cooked. When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash; it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crispy consistency. Raw chayote may be added to salads or salsas, most often marinated with lemon or lime juice, but is often regarded as especially unpalatable and tough in texture. Whether raw or cooked, chayote is a good source of vitamin C. Although most people are familiar only with the fruit as being edible, the root, stem, seeds and leaves are edible as well. The tubers of the plant are eaten like potatoes and other root vegetables, while the shoots and leaves are often consumed in salads and stir fries, especially in Asia.

Yomari

Yomari, also called yamari, (Nepal Bhasa: 𑐫𑑀𑐩𑐵𑐬𑐷 or 𑐫𑑅𑐩𑐵𑐬𑐷) is a delicacy of the Newar community in Nepal. It is a steamed dumpling that consists of an external covering of rice flour with sweet fillings such as chaku. The delicacy plays a very important role in Newa society, and is a key part of the festival of Yomari Punhi. According to some, the triangular shape of the Yamari is a symbolical representation of one half of the Shadkona, the symbol of Saraswati and wisdom.

Chaku

Chaku (Nepali: चाकु pronounced [ˈt͡saku] (listen)) is a Newari cuisine made from concentrated sugarcane juice, jaggery, ghee, and nuts. The mixture is cooked down until it is a solid form, and then pulled on a hook in a manner similar to making taffy and then cut into small rolls, or it may be cooked in a shallow dish and cut into small diamond shaped pieces. Chaku may be eaten separately, or it can also used in making Yomari (योमरी). Chaku is served by Nepalese with ghee and yams during the festival of Maghe Sankranti.

Mezcal

Mezcal" (/mɛˈskæl/, American Spanish: [mesˈkal]) is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from any type of maguey. The word mezcal comes from Nahuatl mexcalli [meʃˈkalːi], which means "oven-cooked agave", from metl [met͡ɬ] and ixcalli [iʃˈkalːi]. Traditionally the word "mezcal" has been used generally in Mexico for all maguey spirits and it continues to be used for many maguey spirits whether these spirits have been legally certified as "mezcal" or not, and it is also considered a drink of artisan origin.

Shiratama

"Shiratama" is dumplings made from rice flour called shiratamako. Knead shiratamako with water which weighs 80 to 90 percent of the shiratamako and divide the dough into bite-sized pieces. Boil them in hot water, then put them into cold water. You can put the completed shiratama into shiruko (sweet red-bean soup), or garnish anmitsu (traditional Japanese dessert made with kanten [agar agar] jelly, fruits, and sweet red bean paste), mitsumame (dessert made with gelatin cubes and mixed fruits) or shaved ice (flavored with syrup) with it.

Read more...

Shiratamako

白玉粉(しらたまこ)は、もち米を加工した粉(うるち米を加える製品もある)。もち米を粉にし、水中で沈殿した物。 寒中に沈殿作業を繰り返し乾燥させるため、別名は寒晒し(かんざらし)、もしくは寒晒し粉。

Read more...

Chili Con Carne

Chili con carne (also spelled chilli con carne or chile con carne and shortened to chili or chilli; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃili kon ˈkaɾne]), meaning "chili with meat", is a spicy stew containing chili peppers (sometimes in the form of chili powder), meat (usually beef), tomatoes and often kidney beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. The dish originated in northern Mexico or southern Texas.

Read more...