Shiratama

"Shiratama" is dumplings made from rice flour called shiratamako. Knead shiratamako with water which weighs 80 to 90 percent of the shiratamako and divide the dough into bite-sized pieces. Boil them in hot water, then put them into cold water. You can put the completed shiratama into shiruko (sweet red-bean soup), or garnish anmitsu (traditional Japanese dessert made with kanten [agar agar] jelly, fruits, and sweet red bean paste), mitsumame (dessert made with gelatin cubes and mixed fruits) or shaved ice (flavored with syrup) with it.

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Chili Con Carne

Chili con carne (also spelled chilli con carne or chile con carne and shortened to chili or chilli; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃili kon ˈkaɾne]), meaning "chili with meat", is a spicy stew containing chili peppers (sometimes in the form of chili powder), meat (usually beef), tomatoes and often kidney beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. The dish originated in northern Mexico or southern Texas.

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Manjū

Manjū (饅頭, まんじゅう) is a traditional Japanese confection. Of the many varieties of manjū, most have an outside made from flour, rice powder, kudzu, and buckwheat, and a filling of anko (red bean paste), usually made from boiled adzuki beans and sugar. Manjū is sometimes made with other fillings such as chestnut jam. In Hawaii, one can find Okinawan manjū that are made with a filling of purple sweet potato, butter, milk, sugar, and salt, but the most common filling is bean paste, of which the several varieties include koshian, tsubuan, and tsubushian.

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Pastrami

Pastrami (Romanian: pastramă) is a Romanian dish usually made from beef brisket, and sometimes from lamb, or turkey. The raw meat is brined, partially dried, seasoned with herbs and spices, then smoked and steamed. Like corned beef, pastrami was originally created as a way to preserve meat before the invention of refrigeration. One of the iconic meats of American Jewish cuisine and New York City cuisine, hot pastrami is typically served at delicatessens on sandwiches such as the pastrami on rye.

Lavash

Lavash is a thin flatbread usually leavened, traditionally baked in a tandoor (tonir) or on a sajj, and common to the cuisines of South Caucasus, Western Asia, and the areas surrounding the Caspian Sea. Lavash is one of the most widespread types of bread in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Iran and Turkey. The traditional recipe can be adapted to the modern kitchen by using a griddle or wok instead of the tonir.

Streusel

In baking and pastry making, streusel (German pronunciation: [ˈʃtʁɔʏzl̩]) is a crumbly topping of flour, butter, and sugar that is baked on top of muffins, breads, pies, and cakes. Some modern recipes add spices and chopped nuts. The mixture can also be layered or ribboned in the middle of a cake.